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on the unfunded obligations. we want to stop the spending problem so we can fix the deficit. we want to get people back to work, which is why again, we take the position that raising tax rates is absolutely not something that helps get people back to work. >> what was the importance of that, rather than just going ahead with visas that you agree are very, very important? >> well, again, what we believe is this was the first step forward in terms of trying to address the need for modernization in our visa laws. and we have a system of lottery that, frankly, i think, is properly replaced with a system that rewards those who want to come here to help create jobs and help get our economy back on track. so it's very much, i think, in sync with our priority of helping americans get back to work, helping create more jobs for more americans. >> democrats have now said after your response towards the thee house's proposal that ball is now in your court, that the onus is on you to put forth a proposal. is the ball in the republicans' court now? >> well, we remain committed at all -- at all instances to enga
the long term effects of our deficit, which are directly tied to health care -- the work that has been done in the congress as it relates to constructing and exchange that will take place in 2014 and go into effect, and the tools that we provided a initially on a concept that by its very nature was one designed by republicans, that there is ample room for us to tackle the unbelievable rise in cost of health care to 17% of our gross domestic product by focusing on dropping those costs. most recently the president of aetna said very clearly -- not only if we drop those costs would we make health care more affordable, we would also deal with balancing our national debt. so these are all very constructive areas that we all should agree to. that the american public wants us to pursue. we remain optimistic because of the way the president has gone out there and is selling this concept, not only in white house public. i commend leader boehner, speaker boehner, setting the appropriate tone in the conference. we know there are differences in both the caucus and the conference, but it is the common t
political adviser indicated that medicare and medicaid are the main drivers of our deficit. i know we have seen this morning also several editorial writers indicate the same, that it is important that we put these drivers of the deficit on the table and include them as part of any agreement to avoid the fiscal cliff. as the speaker said, we have done our part. we have put revenues on the table, something we did not do two years ago during the debt ceiling negotiation. we still believe that it is most important for us to address the economic situation in this country where so many people are out of work. that is why we take the position and believe strongly that increase in marginal rates i, income-tax rates, is not the way to produce growth and put people back to work. but we have not seen any good faith effort on the part of its administration to talk about the real problem that we're trying to fix. i am told mr. bowles, some of us will meet with him later today, said earlier this morning there has been no serious discussion by the white house on entitlements, on medicare and medicaid. th
street greed in the form of a $6 trillion housing bubble. this brought large budget deficits. some at the center of the housing crash are pushing to deep cuts to social programs to cure the budget deficit. the c.e.o. of goldman sachs, who received a $10 billion direct bailout at below market interest rates have preached about decreasing social security benefits and increasing the retirement age. main street americans have lost more than 40% of their wealth from 2007 to 2010. nearly one in six u.s. residents is officially poor, the highest rate in 50 years. 22% of american children live in poverty. we're facing an economic situation that resembles the years leading up to the great depression. now, this prevailing budget plan calls for deep cuts, environmental protection, social security, medicare, medicaid. well, corporations and the top 1% get tax cuts of nearly $3 trillion over the next decade. this is not how you protect a democracy. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. poe: i ask unanimous
republican members of the house and the senate speak out on the need or a deficit approach that includes raising taxes on wealthy individuals and to moving right away to ensure that 98% of families do not race a tax increase. we need to look -- do not face a tax increase. we need to look at history. what we saw in the 1990s and 2000s, there was no relationship between lower marginal tax rates for the wealthiest among us an economic growth. first during the clinton administration, the top marginal tax rate was raised on the wealthiest individuals and the economy grew at its fastest rate in a generation. it added more than 22 million jobs. during the following eight years, the top marginal rate dax tax rate was lower, but economy never regained its strength from the reviews decade. middle-class families are vulnerable when the recession began at the end of 2007. i hope this hearing is helpful not just in this hearing, but across this country to people who are watching and waiting for congress to act. i will say more at the end about some of our members who are leaving. it is -- it has been
capitol hill. then eric cantor response of the lighthouse deficit reduction package. later, nancy pelosi addresses the fiscal cliff and middle- class tax cuts. president obama talked about the so-called fiscal cliff and his proposal to end of the bush tax cuts on those earning more than two and a $50,000. ed -- more than $250,000. ["hail to the chief" plays] please have a seat. have a seat. relax for a second. it is good to see all of you. hello. it is good to be back in pennsylvania. it is good to be right here. i want to thank michael, robert, and the investor, joel glickman for hosting me today and giving me a great tour. stand up so everybody can see you, guys. [cheers and applause] there you go. we have a couple of outstanding members of congress here. [cheers and applause] now, i just finished getting a tour of the workshop. i have to say it makes me wish that joel invented this stuff sooner when i was a kid. back then, you couldn't build a roller coaster out of your erector set. i got a chance to meet some of the folks who have been working around the clock to keep up with the chr
the president called his deficit reduction commission to give the president and -- an idea what we could do to get our fiscal house in order. i want to show in you this chart, mr. speaker, it's the chronic deficits we have had in this country, goes back to 1970. all this red ink represents the inflation adjusted, 2012 dollars, comparing apples to apples across this chart, the deficit that is we have had in this country, and you see going back to 197 o 0, mr. speaker, which happens to be the year of my birth, we have run a deficit every single year from 199 . you remember 1998 we had newt gingrich leading the first republican u.s. house of representatives in modern times. bill clinton in the white house. they came together to solve some big problems. welfare reform, health insurance reform. folks forget about health insurance reform. we did away with pre-existing conditions. did away with all of the impediments in the large group markets, what they call the plans, had great success in that area, and finally got back into some positive territory. to be truthful, this assumes that all the fede
to the labour party. they want to be in government and they claim they want to cut the deficit. what would they cut? what would they cut? if they object to the local government settlement and the object to the defense settlement and the objective the nhs budget and the object to the education budget, even though nhs schools are going up, and what exactly would they do? the problem is as was evident from the shadow chancellor's response, they didn't have anything to say on these matters but if they had a credible deficit plan then we would listen to the questions they ask us about the priorities of those plans. >> john stephenson. >> this cools and colleges of 270 million are extremely welcome. schools and colleges such as those in my constituency plans on the runway ready to take off, just in a little additional financial support. will the chancellor help those colleges and schools? >> i'm very happy to look personally at the case my honorable friend makes for his local education facility. these are of course other government departments but we have provided the money for education, for ne
this morning. you made a comment that you did not believe anybody was interested in solving this deficit problem. that about knocked me out of my chair. i need you to explain to me and the rest of the people watching why you said that anthony g. to -- and i need you to expound on that. i will take my answer off the air. please ask mr. reid to not to be such an obstructionist and sit down and listen. have a great day. guest: imitate a few days for that message out to get through from me. there's a lot of concern about budget deficits. in the period after the downturn, budget deficits for in a range of 10% of the entire gdp, the entire economic output of the u.s. they have come down a little bit. economists think to be sustainable, budget deficits have to be in the range of 3% of economic output or a lower. the focus of this effort to reduce deficits now is on getting them, in the federal budget deficit to the range of 3% or so. that is what i mean when i say policymakers are not trying to get rid of the budget deficits. given the economic weakness, a little bit of deficit spending is pro
. [ screaming ] oh grover! electric deficit boogaloo. 29 minutes after the hour. right back on "the stephanie miller show." >> wow! i've never seen anything like this. >> when disaster strikes sometimes the only way out is to look within. current tv digs deep into the determination and escape. "trapped" experience the drama. back to back to back. >> hold on mates! >> catch the "trapped" mini-marathon saturday starting at 1 eastern. on current tv. rich, chewy caramel rolled up in smooth milk chocolate. don't forget about that payroll meeting. rolo.get your smooth on. also in minis. get irresistibly clean and fresh carpets in your home with resolve deep clean powder. the moist powder removes three times more dirt than vacuuming alone while neutralizing odors for a clean you can see, smell and really enjoy. don't just vacuum clean. resolve clean. [ singing christmas carols in background ] aunt sally's singing again. it's a tradition honey. [ singing christmas carols ] mmmm. [ female announcer ] make new traditions with pillsbury grands! cinnamon rolls. [ f
. tea party 2, the sequel. [ screaming ] oh grover! electric deficit boogaloo. 29 minutes after the hour. right back on "the stephanie miller show." alright, in 15 minutes we're going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying to look out for us. [ male announcer ] red lobster's crabfest ends soon. hurry in and try five succulent entrees like our tender snow crab paired with savory garlic shrimp. just $12.99. come into red lobster and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. salads, sandwiches, and more. rich, chewy caramel rolled up in smooth milk chocolate. don't forget about that payroll meeting. rolo.get your smooth
and bridges and our schools. and i want to do all this while bringing down our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. [ applause ] on this last point, you probably heard a lot of talk in washington and in the media about the deedlines that we're facing on jobs and taxes and investment. this is not some run-of-the-mill debate. this isn't about which political party can come out on top in negotiations. we've got important decisions to make that are going to have a real impact on businesses and families all across the country. our long-term goal is to get our long-term deficit under control in a way that is balanced and is fair and that would be good for businesses, for our economy, for future generations. and i believe both parties can and will work together in the coming weeks to get that done. we know how that gets done. we're going to have to raise a little more revenue, we've got to cut out spending we don't need, building on the trillion dollars of spending cuts we've already made, and if we combine those two things, we can create a path where america's paying its bills while
and afghanistan, shaving another trillion off of the deficit. that gets us to around 4 trillion in deficit over the next ten years. we are almost at 5 trillion in deficit reduction. as they sign the game shows, that's not all. the white house is also asking for about 200 billion in stimulus. according to the weekly standard, when senate minority leader mitch mcconnell saw the proposal, he quote, burst into laughter. he literally lol 'd. >> i've been very guarded in what i wanted to say. i didn't want it make it harder for me it say or the president or members of both parties to find common ground. but when i come out the day after the election and make it clear that republicans will put revenue on the table, i took a great risk. and then the white house spends three weeks trying to develop a proposal and they send one up here, the calls for $1.6 trillion of new taxes, calls for not even $400 billion in cuts, and they want to have extra spending, that's actually greater than the amount they are willing to cut. i mean, it's -- it was not a serious proposal. and so, right now, we're almost nowhere
.o.p. forget tax rates in talks on the deficit, let's look at the spending. the speaker's swift rejection of an idea floated by representative tom cole of oklahoma, a respected party strategist and former chair of the house g.o.p. campaign committee came as the republicans voiced increasing concerns over the debate of the so-called fiscal cliff. boehner said it's time for them to get serious about the spending problem that our country has. republicans complain that for all the talk of coming up with a balanced budget plan, he has made little effort to identify specific proposals beyond increasing taxes on the wealthy. "the white house has not produced any of the balance in the president's described balance proposal that peter roscoe, the house g.o.p.'s deputy whip. boehner and the other house republican leaders will meet on thursday with treasury sec tir tim geitner and the white house's chief congressional li aison to discuss the fiscal cliff. that's the hill newspaper. here's politico this morning, inside the talk, fiscal cliff deal emerging is what some write this morning. and that's f
. not a driver of the deficit but, hey, cut that. one more specific. preserve the bush-era tax rates for income over $250,000. it's not a tax increase for everybody who earns over $250,000. it's only the income over $250,000 that would get additional taxes if the bush-era rates went away and the president's proposal was passed. but, no, they want to preserve -- totally preserve tax cuts for income over $250,000. they want to preserve the reduced capital gains rate and dividends rate which principally who ben pets, who else, millionaires and billionaires. now -- benefits, who else, millionaires and billionaires. they did have the jay wellington wimpy plan. you remember him? popeye. i will pay you for a hamburger today. unspecified tax loopholes. we will lower the tax rates for the people on the top. but they'll raise over $800 billion. the ability to deduct the interest on their home mortgage, do they want to take that away? probably. got to come from something pretty big. they don't want to touch the billionaire, millionaire job creator class. now, you know, that's a pretty interesting position
of payments deficit remains petroleum, and to increase our g.d.p. by the maximization of these activities in the united states rather than exporting our dollars abroad. so thank you very much and i think we can sit down now or -- yeah. >> thank you. give us a moment to take our seats. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, our panel discussion is about to begin, featuring senator lamar alexander, senator roy blunt, and our moderator, christine romans. >> can you hear me now? there we go. good morning, rn. -- all right. so i'm a lazy moderator. i've warned everyone. we want to get the ball rolling and talk about this report, talk about the future of energy in this country, and the future of transportation and america's national security with regards to energy. but i want to make sure that all of you know to please jump in. i don't want to ask a question and then ask another question. i want this to be a discussion, and i'll steer it. everyone agree? do we all agree? wonderful. let me start first with fred. nice to see you again. >> good to see you. >> you've heard the findings of the report,
the white house in 1988. but just two years later, the reagan deficits were skyrocketing and president bush was forced to change his most famous line. >> long and bitter battle over the budget officially ended last night. president bush put his signature on the deficit reduction package, including $140 billion in tax increases. >> tax increases. that was a turning point for the modern republican party. the right wing went crazy. and george bush lost re-election. since then the party's been committed to never compromising on the tax issue, no matter the deficit. no congressional republican has voted for an increase in taxes since 1990. think about it. for nearly a quarter of a century, no new income taxes. in the current congress, 236 house republicans vowed never to raise taxes. 40 gop senators also kept that pledge. even president george w. bush, the man who got us into two wars we didn't pay for. the president who exploded our deficit. he insisted the solution to our problems were more tax cuts. president clinton handed him a $236 billion surplus. a surplus. and left office with a $1.2 tr
different economy. what we have now is 8% unemployment. very sluggish growth and a trillion dollar deficit every year. you propose to raise taxes in that environment and you're not going to get growth. >> don't you understand you need to off set-- if you're serious about debt reduction, i think you are, don't you understand you need revenue and spending cuts. stuart: and how do you get revenues. >> how. >> please, go ahead, go ahead. stuart: it's easy you lower tax rates and keep incentive to work harder. >> we've tried that. stuart: and you can't-- what. >> george bush tried that. look at the deficit we had. stuart: well, wait a minute you cannot rewrite economic history. after george bush lowered tax rates the return to the treasury, the money coming into the treasury went way up and the deficit, by the way, in 2007 was 167 billion dollars. >> so. stuart: president obama has got, 167 billion a month just about. don't rewrite economic history, julie. >> i'm not rewriting economic history. stuart: you are. >> i'm not-- >> i'm telling you if you lower tax rates you'll get more revenue. >> t
with a balanced approach. deficit reduction. >> after the president's remarks, i spoke with his main man on the fiscal cliff, treasury secretary tim geithner. >> let me ask you, the reaction to your going up on the hill and saying this is basically the white house position has been -- mitch mcconnell saying i think it was just demeaning for them to ask the treasury secretary to come up here and give a proposal like this and by this we have people saying it's a sham, it's -- you know, ridiculous, it's a nonstarter. when you went up there, you didn't think republicans were going to go "good idea." >> you know, what we're trying to do is get these guys to come together and reach an agreement that's going to be good for the country and good for the economy. >> by these guys you mean you all and the republicans. >> and democrats together. >> and the white house. >> that's what we're trying to do. what we did was put forward a very comprehensive, very carefully designed mix of savings and tax reforms to help us put us back on the path to stabilizing our debt and fixing our debt and living with
house deficit reduction package. later, nancy pelosi addresses the fiscal cliff and middle- class tax cuts. tomorrow on ", washington "" robert -- "washington journal," robert van order on the mortgage loan forgiveness. adult'eman on being an with autism. plus, your emails, phone calls, and tweets. >> c-span, created by cable companies and venture 1979, brought to you as a public service by >> president obama talked about the so-called fiscal cliff and his proposal to end the bush era tax cuts. he spoke at a manufacturing facility in hatfield, pennsylvania, for about 25 minutes. >> thank you! [cheers and applause] >> well, good morning, everybody. everybody, please have a seat, have a seat. relax for a second. it is good to see all of you. hello, hatfield! it is good to be back in pennsylvania and it is good to be right here at connects. i want to thank michael airington and the inventor of connects, joel glickman, for hosting me today. where'd they go? stand up so everybody can see you guys. there you go! i just noticed, we got a couple of outstanding members of congress here. chaka
could not print money, we would be in a very bad way. i just think we need to get this deficit under control. those two wars that we have not paid for need to be paid for. you know, it has to be done. if going off the fiscal cliff means that it will be done, so be it. host: other groups are weighing in on these fiscal cliff talks. here is "the new york times" -- in the "financial times" this morning -- roger altman writing today in "the financial times." president obama will be meeting with several governors today at the white house to talk about the fiscal cliff. they will be meeting this morning around 10:00 a.m. eastern time, and then the governors are slated to hold a news conference at around 11:30 a.m. eastern time. go to our website for more details. washington insiders tackle fiscal cliff policy solutions. the group will hold a roundtable discussion today on the importance of reform to address the nation's debt and deficit spending this event takes place this morning around 8:30 a.m. eastern time. go to our website for all our coverage of the fiscal cliff talks. we have a web
to reduce the deficit. jenna: interesting the president is saying he was speaking off the you have cuff, no teleprompter there. he's speaking about how he's rooting on american business. pointed to a couple of aspects much the economy, improvement in consumer confidence and housing as well. he was going to talk a little bit about the fiscal cliff and that's something we've all been talking about recently, and what it means for us right now and the year ahead. we also have other business news. we'll get back to the president by the way if and when we get that feedback. he will be taking questions from the audience there of business leaders as gregg mentioned. elizabeth mcdonald ever the fox business network is standing by list toning some of what the president had to say about the economy. liz, can you place it in context about where our economy is right now. >> reporter: the president just now was placing it in the -- the economy in the broader context of what is going on in the world, mentioning asia, mentioning europe, and then he turned to what was the most important part of the spee
the deficit? same question as when should ben bernanke start raising interest rates. he told us there is 2014, inflation is not a problem. you don't see it. is that this a problem? why is the ten year treasury just one.6%? whar the bond vigilante's? no one worries about the deficit right now. they're worried about a slow-growth economy. cheryl: using markets have already priced in the fiscal cliff arguments but why do we see markets get so volatile when john boehner comes out, are almost afraid to see him talk again today because senator reid comes out and down and up. so much reaction. >> you can't rule out the risk that nothing is done and they don't reach an agreement and if taxes go up and spending is cut we will be in a recession next year. and employment 9%, we can't rule that out but it doesn't make sense to let that happen for the administration, the principal of punishing the wealthy is enough to allow the rest of the country to go into a funk doesn't make sense. cheryl: we see numbers and taxing the top 2% do nothing to deal with the overall deficit problem but you also think at the
deficits and lower interest rates will lead to growth in the economy and an increase in business travel spending. >>> welcome back. now to the weather channel. reynolds wolf is standing by. what is happening around the country today? >> the story is all west. everything is taking place out west. rain, some strong winds, even some snow. some places snow getting up to around 2, 3 feet, but that is high elevation. but for the eastern seaboard, pretty quiet p. temperatures very mild this time of year. when you get into the center of the u.s., still fairly mild conditions. a bit cooler as you might imagine in spots up like towards the twin cities and even over towards chicago. but then out west, that's where the trouble really brews. it's that time of year that there's norm lay big area of high pressure that sets up off the west coast. that's gone and that allows all the pacific moisture to come through. high snow will be an issue. rain in seattle. so how is it going to affect your travel? a little bit of a trend continuing here. again, all your issues out towards the west. san francisco, ma
, congress realized that if they couldn't compromise on a deficit and revenue plan, our economy would crash. turns out they couldn't compromise. so here's what they did. in order to force themselves to work together and compromise, they concocted a catastrophic penalty that would itself crash our economy. brilliant. put it another way. if there is an asteroid headed towards the earth, we made it and fired it at ourselves. because otherwise we would never have done the hard work required to protect ourselves from asteroids. >> good morning. it's friday, november 30th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set, we have msnbc political analyst and vice president and executive editor of msnbc.com, richard wolffe is here. >> he's here? >> my lord. right here on the set. political editor and white house correspondent for the huffington post, sam stein. >> hi. >> cute thing. and msnbc political analyst and visiting professor at nyu and former democratic congressman harold ford jr. >> good morning. >> good morning. >> he's reading. >> put that down right now. put the smut down. close it up. >> i'm l
. it is social deficits, executive function issues -- they can be put to work. if i may backtrack, because again we have heard about prevalence rates and the confusion of where these numbers come from. not once have i heard today the fact that the dsm iv, which constructs the criteria of who deserves a diagnosis, not once has anybody said that one of the reasons for expanding diagnosis was the expanding criteria to what needs a diagnosis. first off, the inclusion of asperger's, in 1994 opened up the book to a plethora of people including myself who never before would have qualified for an autism spectrum disorder, but even for traditional audits and the definition was changed. i may get these numbers wrong, but in the old book it was six mandatory criteria for a diagnosis of autism. if you got five but not six, back in those days it was mental retardation. now i believe it is eight optional out of a field of 16 possible criteria. that blows those numbers out of the water. >> i see my time is up. >> do you want to be recognized for a minute? mr. blaxill has a quick comment to be made? >> on the s
that doubled the tax hikes that he campaigned on and it adds about $150 billion more, not less to the deficit in and new spending. to republicans with that kind of equivalent of lucy and the football and they are laying flat on their backs? >> republicans scoffed at this first foray from the white house. they thought was ridiculous. for the white house it was the first attempt, first specific plan we've seen since the election being put out there. it was frankly a wish list. john boehner acknowledges as much in his comments was that the white house would like to see. if we do get a deal before christmas it won't look anything like this. >> gregg: instead of meeting with members of congress, even day after day and tens of thousands of dollars the president doesn't do that. the president heads back on the campaign trail gives speeches about it. how frustrating is this to some of the folks on capitol hill who do want to sit down and work with him? >> i think it's frustrating to some members of congress, perhaps members of his own party more than anything. if you look at his record he doesn't do
, and their schools. i want to do this by bringing down our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. [applause] >> on this last point, you probably heard a lot of talk in washington and in the media about the deadlines that we're facing on jobs and taxes and investments. this is not some run-of-the-mill debate. this isn't about which political party can come out on top in negotiations. we've got important decisions to make that are going to have a real impact on businesses and families all across the country. our ultimate goal, our long-term goal is to get our long-term deficit under control in a way that is balanced and is fair. that would be good for businesses, for our economy, for future generations. and i believe both parties can and will work together in the coming weeks to get that done. we know how that gets done. we're going to have to raise a little more revenue. we've got to cut out spending we don't need, building on the trillion dollars of spending cuts we've already made. and if we combine those two things, we can create a path where america's paying its bills while still being a
prosperity for america, helps reduce our budget deficit, is humane, is enforceable, no one said it would be easy but that's what the people send us hoar to do and regardless of the outcome of this particular bill, we are simply taking another week in avoiding addressing the real issues of the imdepration crisis in this country. i encourage my colleagues to vote against the rule which was a closed process and doesn't allow for consideration of even noncontroversial amendments such as my ev-5 amendment. and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from florida. mr. nugent: mr. speaker, and to my good friend from colorado, we agree on so many issues. particularly as it relates to immigration reform. we agree. i think this is the first step in regards to where we need to go. you have sold a very persuasive argument in regards to why it is so important so important that we have a stem vee is program. -- visa program. while it's important to us to keep that brainpower we educated in the united states, keep them here in this country
spending her hard-earned tax dollars like water, running trillion-dollar deficits year after year. she's angry and she has every right to be angry. so what are we going to do about it? lately we've heard a lot of talk about raising revenues, but not nearly enough talk about bringing the federal government down to the right size, about matching spending to the resources we have, about balancing the federal budget. oh, we hear about a balanced approach, but that's just a way of saying we need to increase taxes. actually, we don't need to increase taxes. the best thing we could do would be to not increase taxes. the best thing we can do is to raise revenues by making our economy as healthy and strong as it can be. that means we need to help our businesses grow and hire. that's become way too hard to do in the past couple of years. a businessman in duchess county, new york, said he's going to have to limit the number of employees he has to less than 50 so he won't be subject to penalties under the 2010 health law. so right now the federal government is keeping him from offering jobs. that
a trillion dollars in cuts. revenues are needed and job creation is essential to reducing the deficit. >> reporter: now one weapon that the administration has at its disposals treasury secretary timothy geithner could tell companies to freeze the withholding rates for those making up to $250,000. i should be clear that geithner has not threatened to do so, in fact he's down-playing it. but if the congress and the white house fail to get a deal geithner could act on his own in the new year to freeze withholding rates for those making up to 250k. jon. jon: interesting. mike emanuel in the capitol building, thank you. jenna: the president's opening bid to avoid the fiscal cliff, already called a none starter by republicans including this $1.6 trillion in new taxes. 400billion in spending cuts, tbd specifically on that. a little extra cash for infrastructure spending, republicans call that stimulus. and a plea for new powers to raise the debt ceiling without having to go directly to congress. joe trippi is howard dean's former campaign manager and a fox news contributor. good to see you t
schools, and i want to do all this while bringing down our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. now -- [ applause ] >> on this last point we probably heard a lot of talk in washington and in the media about the deadlines that we're facing on jobs and taxes and investment. this is not some run of the mill debate. this isn't about which political party can come out on top in negotiations. we've got important decisions to make, and they'll have a real impact on businesses and families all across the country. our ultimate goal, our long-term goal is to get our long-term deficit under control in a way that is balanced and is fair. that would be good for businesses, for our economy, for future generations. i believe both parties can and will work together in the coming weeks to get that done. we know how that gets done. we're iffing to have to raise a little more revenue. we got to cut on the spending we don't need, building on the trillion dollars of spending cuts we've already made, and if we combine those two things, we can create a path where america is paying its bills while still be
a balanced approach to deficit reduction that doesn't hurt the economy and doesn't hurt middle class families. if we agree that we should not raise taxes on middle class families, let's begin our work with where we agree. >> of course there are some lawmakers who are not that optimistic. they don't think there's enough time between now and the end of the year to get a deal done. nonetheless the president will continue pushing his message. he heads to pennsylvania tomorrow. he will go to a manufacturing plant where he will continue talking about extending the middle class tax cuts, not extending them for the upper class americans. in the meantime, there's pushback from republicans who are saying the president should not be out the road campaigning but back here in washington negotiating. >> dan, i will ask you to look into your crystal ball. president obama is meeting with mitt romney later today. do you have any idea what they plan to discuss? >> you know, there's a lot of speculation about governor romney playing a role in the administration. but the president himself, during his victory spe
of any significant agreement will reduce our deficit. mr. bowles himself said yesterday there has been no serious discussion so far. there is a real danger of going off the fiscal cliff. going off the fiscal cliff will hurt our economy. it will cost american jobs. republicans have taken action to avert the fiscal cliff by passing legislation to stop all the tax hikes, to replace the sequester, and pave the way for tax reform and entitlement reform. we are the only ones with a balanced plan to protect the economy, protect american jobs, and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. without spending cuts and entitlement reform, it will be impossible to address our country's debt crisis and get our economy going again and to create jobs. right now all eyes are on the white house. the country does not need a victory lap. it needs leadership. it is time for the president and congressional democrats to tell the american people what spending cuts they're willing to make. with that, i will take a few questions. [indiscernible] >> it has been very clear over the last year and a half. i ha
of that balance? the president said he was going to help curb back the debt and tackle this deficit. instead, the president has the gull to actually go out and suggest that we should get rid of the debt ceiling votes and take away congress' ability to help put a lid on that. essentially wants a limitless credit card. that is a nonstarter for us in the house of representatives and the president should share with us what he thinks he should be cutting. not just 10, 20 years out in advance, what are we going to cut in year one naepts wh. that's what i want to hear from the president. >> i want to talk about what you think needs to be more specific. let's talk about the debt ceiling for a second. the debt ceiling is not more money. it is raising the level to accommodate what congress has already appropriated. it's not an unlimited spending -- credit card. most serious economists think that it's -- it is an unnecessary act. why not review the bidding on how the debt ceiling should be used. it's used as a shotgun to the head of either party, either president. >> look. there's got to be some limit
took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've been keeping my own naughty and nice lists for washington. >> warner: the president chose a seasonal setting, a toy factory in hatfield, pennsylvania, and holiday imagery to press again for extending tax cuts for the middle class. >> if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically go up on january 1. i mean, i... i'm assuming that doesn't sound too good to you. >> no. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. >> warner: in washington, republicans portrayed the road trip as so much humbug, at a time, they said, when negotiations are going nowhere. >> there's a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. >> warner: house speaker john boehner said republicans remain willing to raise revenues, but not by raising tax rates. and he charged the white house isn't negotiating in good faith. >> the day after the election, i said the republican majority would a
be called upon to do a little more in terms of helping to pay down our deficit and debt. i think the electorate answers that question so that's got to play a role in the negotiation and has. but i think we'll get to yes. >> how are you going to do it though? you said you know you're going to have to compromise. what areas in entitlements, for instance, or other areas do you think there is a willingness to compromise to get us closer to resolving the fiscal cliff issue? >> i think democrats have already shown a willingness to make very significant cuts. we've already in the budget control act agreed to an excess of $1 trillion of cuts. that's a pretty good faith counsel payment on our willingness to come to the table and do things that are very painful and difficult for us to do. we haven't seen that yet reciprocated in terms of gop willingness to raise the kind of revenues that we've already committed to reducing in terms of spending cuts. but i think we've demonstrated very good faith that we're ready to make the hard calls to pay down our debt, balance our books. at the same ti
of americans, democrats, republicans, independents, they agreed with a balanced approach to deficit reduction and making sure that middle class taxes don't go up. folks agreed to that. now, the good news is we're starting to see a few republicans coming around to it too. >> jessica yellin at the white house, how much of this is kabooki dance? >> reporter: the real issue is, again, over raising tax rates. that is where both sides are feeling each other out. and the white house is adamant that they will not budge on this issue. and the bottom line is house republicans say that that's a no-go for them, joe. and so the question is, will house republicans come around on raising tax rates? you know, right now they say they're not going to move on it. so the white house is sort of holding back and waiting to see if house republicans move on that one issue. and right now they are very far apart because there's no giff on that. on the entitlements question, the white house does have to go further than they've gone. they have been willing to give some, but they have to go further. and the white house i
that resulted in this enormous deficit, because in the 199os, we had a $5.6 trillion surplus. what the president is trying to do is to give relief to working people, and as well provide revenue to continue to support the needs of this nation. such as mayor bloomberg, who's just come to washington and asked for an enormous amount of money, rightly so, to help those who've been victims of hurricane sandy. so the president is not in any way suggesting that he's not willing to negotiate. he asked the questions, when are the republicans going to be considerate of those who get up every day and work? or those who need medicare or social security and medicaid? that is what the bottom line is for the president and for democrats, to protect benefits in a reasonable manner, and to ensure that we have the revenue to bring down the deficit and to continue to operate in the needs of the american people. >> i'd like to talk about those entitlement programs because i know that this is very near and dear to your heart. the lion's share of the $400 billion in cuts are expected to come from medicare and possibly
'm optimistic we'll continue to work together. >> our ultimate goal is an agreement that gets long-term deficit under control in a way that is fair and balanced. >> stocks trade on fiscal cliff comments from president obama and john boehner. >> no substantive progress has been made in talks between the white house and the house over the last two weeks. the white house has to get serious. >> republicans know where we stand. we have said it. we've said it. we've said it so many times. >> i think all of us today are confident we can reach a bipartisan agreement by christmastime. >> according to a congressional republican aides who have talked to "the wall street journal," they obtained a copy of the white house prover here in the negotiations. >> do you have faith in any of them to rise above? >> would it be okay to go over? >> we will rise above. >> eamon javers joins us live from washington. they seem farther apart than ever before. the dow is above 13,000 for the first time in several weeks. do you think the markets are reading comments correctly? >> i do think markets have gotten it wrong a lo
the business community views this deficit thing as the biggest problem that we can solve that we need to solve. there's something called a campaign to fix the debt, which i'm on the steering committee, 120 leading ceos from everything from general electric to jpmorgan on down. really committed to doing something and accepting the idea that revenues have to go up, not ideological about how, but most of all, wanting a big $4 trillion package. and so they have become, in effect, allies of the president. they're really trying to get to the same place. at some point there may be differences over how much entitlements, how much this or that, but right now their interests are aligned, and they both agreed to be friends again. and so they've spent a stream of business ceos into the white house. the president -- yesterday the business roundtable and gave a very warm and accommodating speech. and they are comrades in arms, the least for the time being. >> willie, what a big difference from what we heard from business leaders for the first four years. this is a pretty dramatic shift. >> or even just a fe
to stop the spending problem so we can then go about trying to manage down the debt and deficit. >> nbc's first read made this point. the white house is sending the message that if republicans want entitlement reform, they're the ones who will have to propose it. how much of this is about getting the gop to do some of the dirty work on a sticky issue for democrats? >> i think that is a very big part of it. look, nobody -- we just went through a campaign in which medicare, the ryan budget, and changes to medicare and cuts out of medicare were such a huge issue, both sides claiming that they wanted to protect seniors. but, look, i think the democrats believe that they have an opportunity, they have leverage on the tax issue, that they don't want to talk about these entitlement changes until the republicans agree to increase the tax rate on the top 2%. because after all, there was a bill that passed out of the senate and they believe that at the end of the day, if that bill is still on the plate, on the republicans' plate in the house, they'll have to pass it staring down the fiscal cliff.
the medicine. it will fix the problem and the deficit problem as long as everything in the fiscal cliff happens. as long as sequestration happens it will hurt defense. tax rate goes up. eventually you will get someone out, to get that president out and get president who wants lower tax rates and congress that wants the lower tax rate and maybe a senate. it would hurt dramatically. best time to do it is now. >> andrea: there are two schools of thought here. one if you follow twitter or watch republicans who are on the pundit circle, they say let them go off cliff and let obama own that. there is another one that says just let him have what he wants and then when the economy nose dives he will have to own it. republicans are going to get blamed anyway. do you feel strong about either one of those? >> dana: not necessarily. i do think i see in "washington post," headline, obama offers plan for cliff. plan to be in quotes. the thing that amazes me and the media lets it happen. for eight years or longer now. i had to defend how many times people said on the left, including president obama when he wa
in these negotiations or in terms of reducing this $1.1 trillion deficit if you don't do something about these entitlements. so everyone's kind of waiting, when will the president come forward with those recommendations? >> if i could just jump in really quick, one of the problems with entitlement cuts is they don't produce a lot of savings in the first ten years. >> that's true. that's true. >> a lot of the things ryan proposed are going to be phased in gradually. if we're going to be obsessively focused on the ratio between revenue and spending, then republicans are going to be in for some disappointment because all the things they want on entitlements basically phase in. this is consistent what they said about not wanting to change things for people over 55. and the fact that even paul ryan and mitt romney ran away from entitlement cuts in paul ryan's budget in the last election i think is a sign of where the american public is. they do want the rich to pay their fair share in taxes, but they really don't like a lot of the entitlement cuts. >> that's a fair point. that's a fair point.
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